• The Deserving and the Devious

    In coverage of the ongoing dispute over payouts under the BP Deepwater Horizon business economic loss settlement fund, this week’s edition of 60 Minutes effectively highlighted the absurdity of the way in which the compensation fund has been administered, encouraging a slew of meritless claims.

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  • The USHCC Applauds BP America's Record-Breaking Restoration Efforts

    The United States Hispanic Chamber of Commerce (USHCC) applauds BP America, one of the nation's leading energy producers, for making the most substantial investment toward environmental restoration in history following the Deepwater Horizon oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico. In total, the company has spent over $26 billion in government claims and clean-up, committed $1 billion to restoration, and has allocated $500 million for independent scientific research over the next decade. Last week, BP publically announced that up to $500 million in relief funds, initially intended for those damaged by the Gulf of Mexico oil spill, may have been unrightfully claimed by individuals who were not affected by the accident - including individuals who lost their businesses long before the spill.

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  • Row Between Lawyers Hits BP’s Gulf of Mexico Oil Spill Deal

    BP’s multibillion-dollar compensation settlement for its 2010 Gulf of Mexico oil spill has been hit in a battle between lawyers over allegations of misconduct. Two lawyers who were criticised for their roles in compensation awards have raised concerns about how hundreds of claims were pushed to the head of the queue by staff administering payments.

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  • '60 Minutes' Reports on BP's Claims of Fraud in Gulf Oil Spill Settlement

    60 Minutes reported Sunday (May 4) on the ongoing tug-of-war over who should be paid under the multibillion-dollar settlement for victims of the BP oil spill.

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  • '60 Minutes': Over A Barrel - Video

    The biggest accidental oil spill the world has ever seen began with the explosion, in 2010, of the Deepwater Horizon in the Gulf of Mexico. Thousands of businesses suffered along an oily arc from Texas to Florida. And BP, the company at fault, started paying them compensation right away. BP says it wanted to do the right thing and paying victims early bought the company some goodwill at the time that it was facing criminal charges and billions in federal fines. But now, four years later, BP says it's the victim of Gulf Coast swindlers who have the oil giant over a barrel. BP says it is being forced to pay hundreds of millions of dollars to people who never saw oil anywhere but on TV.

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  • Louisiana Commercial Fishery Tops Gulf of Mexico in Total Catch and Revenue

    Louisiana commercial fishers in 2012 had the largest amount of commercial seafood landed in the Gulf of Mexico and garnered the most revenue from that catch in the region, according to a National Marine Fisheries Service report released on Tuesday. Louisiana commercial fishers landed 1.2 billion pounds and garnered $331 million in revenue, according to the Fisheries Economics of the United States 2012 report.

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  • Alabama BP Oil Disaster Fraud: 5 Indicted in Family-Run $2.4 Million False Claim Scheme

    BIRMINGHAM, Alabama -- Five people were indicted today in connection with a family-led scheme to defraud the fund established by BP PLC for victims of the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill, federal authorities announced. The five charged in today's indictment had recruited 15 others to make false claims, according to a statement from federal authorities.

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  • LA Sets New Tourism Record with 27.3M Visitors

    BATON ROUGE, La. (AP) — Louisiana drew a record 27.3 million tourists to its cities, festivals, outdoor activities and other events last year, drawing $10.8 billion in visitor spending. Lt. Gov. Jay Dardenne outlined the 2013 figures Monday at a tourism promotion lunch, saying the state attracted more outside visitors than the last record set a year earlier.

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  • BP's Billions Draw Scam Artists

    After the Deepwater Horizon rig exploded four years ago in the Gulf of Mexico, hundreds of South Florida residents paid the nonprofit Noula Inc. $300 each, mostly to process claims for wages they said were lost to the oil spill.But a Miami jury last year agreed with federal prosecutors that the claims were scams. They convicted Noula's president, Jean Mari Lindor, of 40 counts including identity theft and mail and wire fraud. "These people would never ¬actually see what was filed on their behalf," Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Watts-Fitzgerald said of Lindor's victims. "Some had no idea what he was doing."

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  • How a Gulf Settlement That BP Once Hailed Became Its Target

    NEW ORLEANS — Four years ago the Deepwater Horizon oil rig caught fire and exploded, killing 11 men, spewing millions of barrels of oil into the Gulf of Mexico and staining, seemingly indelibly, the image of BP, the international energy giant responsible for the well. Its reputation in free fall, the company set aside billions of dollars and saturated the airwaves with contrite pledges to make thousands of businesses and workers whole, from shrimpers to hotel owners to charter boat operators.

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