• BP Is Rapidly Becoming One Giant Law Firm

    BP used to be a company that produces oil. Increasingly these days, it’s producing litigation in almost equal measure. Senior company executives have told me in recent months that a substantial part of the London-based energy giant now effectively operates as a law firm, dealing full-time with what the company sees as the surprisingly persistent courtroom and regulatory fallout from the 2010 Gulf of Mexico disaster.

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  • Shark Attack in the Gulf

    After the flood, the deluge. More than three years after the Deep Horizon oil spill that fouled the Gulf of Mexico, life would have almost returned to normal but for the feeding frenzy of the lawyers eager to take a bite out of the BP settlement fund.

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  • Lawyers' Business Model

    I know from the reaction to several of my recent columns that many readers think I’m misguided to be defending BP against the plaintiffs’ lawyers who sued the company in Louisiana. BP, after all, despoiled the Gulf of Mexico and harmed the people who live there. It had nearly $12 billion in profits last year, and more than $375 billion in revenue. It both deserves what it is getting and can afford to pay the price. But, to me, the question of whether BP can afford to pay is irrelevant. BP is the best example I’ve ever seen of a company that actually tried to find a better way. Immediately after the spill, it set up a claims process to get money into victims’ hands quickly, without having to file a lawsuit. Though that process had its critics, it worked. Of the $11 billion BP has paid out in claims, $6.3 billion was paid through that process.

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  • Editorial: Deepwater Horizon and Deep South Justice

    BP deserves fairness from the US legal system Whatever one thinks of the corporate conduct that caused the Deepwater Horizon tragedy, BP has not shirked its responsibility to compensate the victims. Since 2010, the oil company has paid $11bn to those damaged by the spill.

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  • Oil-Spill Claims Saga: BP Keeps Paying, Corruption Probe Continues

    Here’s a law-school exam question: A court-supervised multibillion-dollar pollution settlement leads to serious allegations of corruption. A federal judge appoints a former FBI director as “special master” to investigate. But the judge orders the defendant company to continue paying claims while the investigation is under way. Discuss.

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  • Getting Skewered in New Orleans

    “All rise,” boomed the bailiff as the Honorable Carl J. Barbier strode to the bench in his courtroom here. It was 8:35 Friday morning. Barbier was frowning.

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  • BP CEO: We're Back on Our Feet

    BP CEO Bob Dudley speaks about the confidence he has in his company, and its buyback program.

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  • Timmons: Halting Jackpot Justice

    BP appeals to end inland claims for coastal spill damage. BP is heading into a Louisiana courtroom Monday to stop a feeding frenzy. Lawyers for the energy giant are going before a federal appeals court to rectify an egregious misreading of the company’s settlement agreement with businesses affected by the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill.

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  • Justice, Louisiana Style

    You can actually pinpoint the moment when the oil company BP began to get hosed in Louisiana: March 2012.

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  • Trial Lawyers Scrape the Bottom of the Barrel After BP Oil Spill

    File this one under “no good deed goes unpunished.”

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