• Will The Supreme Court Take A Stand On Standing In BP Case?

    It is axiomatic that to certify a class, plaintiffs must show all members satisfy Article III standing and Rule 23 requirements. While federal courts "do not require each member of a class to submit evidence of personal standing, a class cannot be certified if it contains members who lack standing" to pursue the claim(s) asserted, according to Halvorson v. Auto Owners Insurance, 718 F.2d 773 (8th Cir. 2013).

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  • Former Deepwater Horizon Claims Administrator Asks Supreme Court to Review Case

    NEW ORLEANS – The former Deepwater Horizon claims chief has filed a brief asking the nation’s highest court to weigh in on the question of whether oil spill claimants should be required to show proof of damage from the Gulf oil spill before collecting settlements from oil giant BP PLC. In an amicus brief filed with U.S. Supreme Court, Kenneth Feinberg, the former special master of the Gulf Coast Claims Facility (GCCF), said not only should claimants be able to show proof they were directly affected by the 2010 oil spill, but that requiring them to do so is vital to maintaining the integrity of the settlement process.

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  • Red Tide Off Northwest Florida Could Hit Economy

    CLEARWATER, Fla. (AP) — It's like Florida's version of The Blob. Slow moving glops of toxic algae in the northeast Gulf of Mexico are killing sea turtles, sharks and fish, and threatening the waters and beaches that fuel the region's economy. Known as "red tide," this particular strain called Karenia brevis is present nearly every year off Florida, but large blooms can be particularly devastating. Right now, the algae is collecting in an area about 60 miles wide and 100 miles long, about 5 to 15 miles off St. Petersburg in the south and stretching north to Florida's Big Bend, where the peninsula ends and the Panhandle begins.

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  • After cases of alleged fraud exposed, claims administrator says tax documents not routinely verified in claims

    NEW ORLEANS – After investigators found that two high-profile claims in the BP oil spill case were based on fraudulent tax documents, the man tasked with paying settlements says he has no plans to routinely authenticate IRS filings of claimants prior to cutting a check.

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  • Letter To The Editor: US Courts Confuse Public Opinion With Justice

    Sir, William Slade (Letters, September 10) demonstrates a level of arrogance and a warped view of justice that is sadly too prevalent in the US. That BP has not been objecting to paying compensation, only to paying compensation to people unaffected by the disaster, is an entirely reasonable position. That the British government has intervened is only to defend a very defensible principle. Mr Slade should be more careful with his questions: we know what happens when an American company is cavalier with the lives of other nationals. Among many examples, consider the 1984 Bhopal disaster in India.

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  • BP's Lessons In Playing Nasty Or Nice

    Within weeks of the epic 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, BP (BP) apologized, acknowledged partial blame, began paying claims and cleanup costs, and sought to settle lawsuits rather than fight in court. Yet after spending more than $28 billion so far to make amends and dilute the public-relations debacle, the London-based oil giant remains enmeshed in litigation. So last year, BP tabled the charm offensive and tried bellicosity instead, accusing some Gulf businesses of submitting bogus claims and hinting broadly that the court-appointed administrator of the compensation effort might be favoring locals.

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  • BP in Louisiana remains an uncapped gusher of cash: James Varney

    A federal court's finding last week that BP was "grossly negligent" with the Deepwater Horizon blowout hardly made the oil behemoth the bad guy. It already played that role.

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  • BP and the Supreme Court

    More than four years after the Deepwater Horizon disaster in the Gulf of Mexico, BP is still wading through the legal morass that it created. The accident in April 2010 was a tragedy that killed 11 men and disrupted the lives of millions. As the US district court in New Orleans found last week, the fault was principally BP’s, and the company has so far paid more than $34bn to put right the harm it caused.

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  • The Costs Of A Miscarriage Of Justice

    When a class action lawsuit gets settled, the deal has to prescribe how the defendant will pay the members of the injured class and who can be part of that class. BP, the global energy company, is embroiled in a dispute over this second question – the definition of the class of businesses that can claim they were injured as a result of the Deepwater Horizon spill. Currently, a lower court is administering the settlement fund in a way that compensates hundreds of people who weren’t injured at all. This approach is simply wrong and constitutes an abuse of the legal process.

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  • BP Files Motion to Remove Patrick Juneau As Claims Administrator

    NEW ORLEANS – Oil giant BP PLC has filed a motion to have Patrick Juneau removed as claims administrator in the Deepwater Horizon oil spill litigation, arguing that he is biased and has not been forthcoming about potential conflicts of interest. The sharply worded 35-page motion filed by BP on Tuesday afternoon caps months of rancor between Juneau, who was appointed in 2012 to oversee the oil spill settlement, and the oil company, which has paid out tens of billions of dollars in damages.

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