• Gulf Fishing Authority Says Red-Snapper Fix Is Easy

    Dr. Bob Shipp is THE authority on Gulf of Mexico red snapper. He recently retired after serving the last 20 years as chairman of the Department of Marine Sciences at the University of South Alabama, and he also served two nine-year stints on the Gulf of Mexico Fishery Management Council, the board responsible for making recommendations to NOAA Fisheries about how federal Gulf fisheries are to be managed. During his time on the council, Shipp served as chairman on three separate occasions.

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  • Why The Job Market Actually Improved After The BP Oil Spill

    In the months after the Deepwater Horizon oil rig exploded in the Gulf of Mexico in 2010, much of America watched the “spill cam,” a live feed that showed oil flowing into the Gulf. From his office next door to the White House, Joseph Aldy was watching economic data – specifically, unemployment claims from Louisiana. They were his first indication that the dire predictions of job losses following the spill weren’t coming true.

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  • BP Atlantis $256 Billion Whistle-Blower Case Dismissed

    BP Plc (BP/) won’t face a $256 billion lawsuit brought by a whistle-blower who claimed the company’s Atlantis oil production platform in the Gulf of Mexico was unsafe. Kenneth Abbott, a former BP contractor, and Food & Water Watch Inc., an environmental group, sued in 2009 to shut down BP’s second-largest gulf platform. They said engineering drawings for the system’s subsea components lacked required safety approvals.

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  • Plaintiffs' Attorneys Strategize Behind Closed Doors On BP Claims Process

    NEW ORLEANS – The recent implementation of a new accounting system in the BP Deepwater Horizon settlement has slowed claims payments to a crawl, creating lots of uncertainty about who will be paid in the future, the lead attorney in the case told fellow plaintiffs’ attorneys last week at a conference sponsored by the Louisiana Association for Justice. The lead plaintiffs’ lawyer, Steve Herman, said lawyers who “exaggerated things a little bit or maybe had a misunderstanding” have prompted oil giant BP to demand – and win – more forensic examinations of claims. Herman appealed for trial lawyers who are seeing their business economic loss (BEL) claims denied to document cases where onerous demands for more proof of loss are occurring.

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  • Local Expert Warns Of Threat To Marine Life In Gulf "Dead Zone"

    CORPUS CHRISTI - Experts are keeping an eye on an area in the Gulf of Mexico that's oxygen-depleted and threatens to put a dent in our seafood industry. An area known as the "dead zone" is the size of the state of Connecticut, about 5,000 square miles.

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  • 'Dead Zone' Off The Gulf Coast Is The Size Of Connecticut

    A Connecticut-sized swath of oxygen-deprived waters off the Gulf Coast is a "poster child for how we are using and abusing our natural resources," says one researcher in Louisiana. In its 30th annual survey, the Louisiana Marine Consortium shows the dead zone has shrunk to about 5,000 square miles and may have stabilized, reports Reuters.

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  • Viewpoint: Oil Spill Editorial Untethered To Facts

    Your editorial faults BP and the U.S. government for making what you say were “falsely optimistic” and “unfounded” claims about dispersants used during the Deepwater Horizon spill. In fact, the statements made by BP and the Unified Area Command in support of the use of dispersants were backed by decades of research and experience, and the best available science and data. Dispersants are a proven, effective tool that are used to reduce the amount of oil that reaches beaches and marshes, thereby reducing damage to the coastal habitat and marine life. They have been used in dozens of countries to treat oil spills, and the net environmental benefits of dispersants are well documented by academia, industry experts and government scientists around the world. In the Deepwater Horizon response, their use was coordinated with and approved by US federal agencies, including the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the U.S. Coast Guard.

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  • New Deepwater Horizon Claims Calculation Formula Could Sharply Reduce Future Settlement Payments

    NEW ORLEANS – An arcane change to the formula that determines awards for settlement of BP oil spill claims may diminish the size of future damage awards, leading some in the trial bar to say that senior plaintiffs’ attorneys who brokered the settlement with BP are more interested in preserving their $660 million payday than in protecting the rights of victims still awaiting payment. In late May, U.S. District Judge Carl Barbier, who oversees settlement of the massive case that arose from the 2010 oil spill off the coast of Louisiana, implemented Rule 495 on all settlements that have not yet been paid. That rule, developed at the behest of the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals, forces businesses seeking damages to more closely match post-spill revenue with expenses. The effect, according to many experts, is that future claims in the Deepwater Horizon case will be smaller and many Gulf Coast businesses once deemed eligible for a settlement may no longer collect at all.

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  • The Gulf Of Mexico 'Dead Zone' Is The Size Of Connecticut

    The Gulf of Mexico has a "dead zone" the size of the state of Connecticut. Scientists from the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration found an area of 5,052 square miles of "low oxygen water" or hypoxia in their annual survey.

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  • Sympathy for the Devil

    Those Bogus Claims Against BP - What does it mean for a company “to do the right thing” after an industrial accident? It used to be standard operating procedure that when something went wrong, companies immediately took to the courts to fight over who got compensated and for how much, trying to minimize their own financial liability. Those fights could take years to resolve, with no guarantee that the plaintiffs would be compensated justly.

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